Bitterness Toward God!

-What’s Right In Your Own Eyes?

The opening line in the Old Testament book of Ruth reads like this:    “During the time of the judges, there was a famine in the land.” So, Ruth needs to be read, in the context, of the book of Judges. In other words, the events take place at that time when, “…everyone did what was right in his own eyes…” Literally, people did whatever they wanted! They lived by the popular philosophy, of our day, called “moral relativism”; which, means that the famine was about more than a lack of food, water & the necessary provisions of life! There was a famine of “faith” in God & there was a famine of “moral character.” That’s the backdrop of Ruth’s story!

-A Redemption Story!

It’s a story about redemption! That is the overarching theme in Ruth’s story. In the opening verse, of the 1st chapter, we see that the famine prompted a man, named Elimelech, to leave Israel— with his wife, Naomi, and their 2 sons— and, move temporarily to the land of Moab. It appears, from the story, that Elimelech died shortly after their arrival; but, for whatever reason (perhaps because the famine raged on) Naomi continued in Moab & raised her 2 sons, who married Moabite women. Sadly, both her sons died; and, Naomi is left with only her 2 daughters-in-law, Ruth and Orpah. Naomi heard that God had provided for the needs of His people, Israel, and the famine had ended (v.6).

-Wherever You Go, I Will Go!

So, she set out to return to Israel by herself, encouraging her daughters-in-law to stay in Moab. But, Ruth was determined to go with her. In v.16, Ruth speaks those famous words to her mother-in-law, Naomi:  “For wherever you go, I will go, and wherever you live, I will live; your people will be my people and your God will be my God.” When Naomi & Ruth return to Naomi’s home town, everyone recognizes her:  “Is that you, Naomi?” But, notice her bitter response:  “Don’t call me Naomi. Call me Mara, for the Almighty has made me very bitter. I went away full, but the Lord has brought me back empty…” (v.20).

-Struggling With Bitterness?

If you’re struggling with bitterness, over the circumstances in your own life, Ruth is the book for you! If you look at all the junk going on in the world & you want to blame God, Ruth is a good book for you to read. Ruth was bitter with God:  “…the Lord has brought be back empty…” What the story reveals is that Naomi had competing gods in her life! So, God has to empty us of all our competing gods in order to break us & make us willing to bow to Him alone! Left to ourselves, we fill our lives with competing gods, from birth.  And, what are some of our false gods?

-The False Gods We Worship!

We are prone to worship the false gods of “safety” & “happiness” & “leisure” & a “pain-free life.” We worship the “gods” who make our lives bright & cheery; and, become satisfied with those things which will not last! And, like Israel, we choose those temporary pleasure gods & reject the God who offers eternal life! So, God has to remove some of those “other loves” in our life to create the space & capacity necessary to genuinely love Him! To truly worship God, with our whole heart, we have to denounce all the competing loves & interests; and, trust God’s Sovereign providence over all areas of our life! Naomi had some competing gods in her life from which she need to be delivered! At the end of the 1st chapter, they arrive in Israel at the time of the barley harvest. So, Ruth gets a job, working to glean the barley for a farmer who “coincidentally” was a relative to Naomi! Come back next week for the rest of the story!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s